Press contact: Sheryl Cannady (202) 707-6456
Public contact: Rob Stone (202) 707-0851
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ada@loc.gov.

December 28, 2012 (REVISED January 7, 2013)

2012 National Film Registry Selections Showcased in January

“Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” “The Times of Harvey Milk” Among Titles

The Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation will spotlight the 2012 selections to the National Film Registry, along with other movie classics, during its January film series. Ten titles recently added to the registry, ranging from Maurice Tourneur’s 1914 comedy-drama "The Wishing Ring" to the 1999 sci-fi action classic "The Matrix," will be screened at the Library’s state-of-the-art theater in Culpeper, Va. "Breakfast at Tiffany’s," starring Audrey Hepburn, will kick off the New Year on Jan. 3.

Other new registry features include Otto Preminger’s "Anatomy of a Murder"; the Laurel-and-Hardy comedy "Sons of the Desert"; Clint Eastwood’s crime drama "Dirty Harry"; the classic western "3:10 to Yuma"; "The Times of Harvey Milk," winner of the 1985 Best Documentary Academy Award; and George Cukor’s "Born Yesterday," starring Judy Holliday in her Oscar-winning role. For more information on the National Film Registry, visit www.loc.gov/film/filmnfr.html.

Later in the month, Christel Schmidt, editor of the new book "Mary Pickford: Queen of the Movies"—published by the Library of Congress in association with the University of Kentucky Press—will host two evenings of Pickford screenings. They include a selection of early short subjects dating from 1909-1912 on Jan. 25, and a new restoration 35mm print of "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall" the following night. The month concludes with "Golddiggers of 1933," the first in a year-long series of films released 80 years ago.

Screenings are preceded by an informative slide presentation about the film, with music selected by the Library’s Recorded Sound Section. Short subjects will be presented before select programs. Titles are subject to change without notice.

All Packard Campus programs are free and open to the public, but children 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult. For reservation information, call (540) 827-1079 ext. 79994 or (202) 707-9994 during business hours, beginning one week before any given screening. Reservations will be held until 10 minutes before showtime. In case of inclement weather, call the theater reservation line no more than three hours before showtime to confirm cancellations. For further information on the theater and film series, visit www.loc.gov/avconservation/theater/.

The Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation is a state-of-the-art facility funded as a gift to the nation by the Packard Humanities Institute. The Packard Campus is the site where the nation’s library acquires, preserves and provides access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of motion pictures, television programs, radio broadcasts and sound recordings (www.loc.gov/avconservation/). The Packard Campus is home to more than 6 million collection items, including nearly 3 million sound recordings. It provides staff support for the Library of Congress National Film Preservation Board, the National Recording Preservation Board, and the national registries for film and recorded sound.

Founded in 1800, the Library of Congress is the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution. It seeks to spark imagination and creativity and to further human understanding and wisdom by providing access to knowledge through its magnificent collections, programs and exhibitions. Many of the Library’s rich resources can be accessed through its website at www.loc.gov.

Series Schedule

Thursday, Jan. 3 (7:30 p.m.)
"Breakfast at Tiffany’s"
(Paramount, 1961)
Blake Edwards directed Truman Capote’s bitter story of self-invented Manhattan call girl Holly Golightly, portrayed by Audrey Hepburn. George Peppard and Patricia Neal are also in the cast of this romantic comedy-drama, which features Henry Mancini’s classic song "Moon River." The film was selected for preservation to the National Film Registry in 2012.

Friday, Jan. 4 (7:30 p.m.)
"Anatomy of a Murder"
(Columbia, 1959)
Directed by Otto Preminger, this gripping courtroom drama was adapted from a best-selling novel that was based on a 1952 murder case. The film stars James Stewart, Lee Remick and Ben Gazzara. It was selected to the National Film Registry in 2012.

Saturday, Jan. 5 (7:30 p.m.)
"The Matrix"
(Warner Bros., 1999)
In this cautionary tale about mankind in revolt against a conspiratorial regime, a computer hacker learns the true nature of his reality from mysterious rebels—and his role in the war against its controllers. Written and directed by Andy Wachowski and Lara Wachowski, the sci-fi action-adventure tale stars Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne and Carrie-Anne Moss. "The Matrix" is one of the films selected to the National Registry in 2012. The film is rated R. No one under 17 will be admitted without a parent or guardian.

Thursday, Jan. 10 (7:30 p.m.)
"Sons of the Desert"
(Hal Roach/MGM, 1933)
In what is considered by many to be their finest feature, Stan Laurel and Ollie Hardy trick their wives into thinking that they are taking a medicinal cruise while they're actually going to a lodge convention. When the spouses learn the truth, they teach the boys a lesson. William A. Seiter directed the comedy, which also features comedian Charley Chase. The film was named to the National Film Registry in 2012.

"The Kidnapper Foil" (Melton Barker, 1936)
For 40 years, Melton Barker traveled through the United States filming local children acting, singing and dancing in two-reel narrative films. Enlisting local movie theaters and newspapers to sponsor and promote the productions, Barker cast local children to act out stories. In 2012, the film was selected for preservation to the National Film Registry.

Friday, Jan. 11 (7:30 p.m.)
"Dirty Harry"
(Warner Bros., 1971)
Clint Eastwood stars as rogue police officer Harry Callahan, who is assigned to track down the self-named Scorpio Killer. Don Seigel directed this crime thriller, which also stars Andrew Robinson. "Dirty Harry" was selected to the National Film Registry in 2012. The film is rated R. No one under 17 will be admitted without a parent or guardian.

Saturday, Jan. 12 (2 p.m.)
"3:10 to Yuma"
(Columbia, 1957)
Delmer Daves directed this western drama based on a short story by Elmore Leonard. Small-time rancher Dan Evans is persuaded to escort a hunted outlaw leader to court to stand trial. Evans has to smuggle him to the nearest town with a railway station to wait for the train to Yuma. Glenn Ford and Van Heflin star as the two conflicted main characters. The film was selected to the National Film Registry in 2012.

Tuesday, Jan. 15 (7:30 p.m.)
"Born Yesterday"
(Columbia, 1950)
In this satire on corruption in Washington, a newspaper reporter takes on the task of educating a crooked businessman's girlfriend, played by Judy Holliday in her Oscar-winning performance. William Holden and Broderick Crawford co-star in this romantic comedy-drama, directed by George Cukor. "Born Yesterday" was selected for the National Film Registry in 2012.

Thursday, Jan. 17 (7:30 p.m.)
"The Times of Harvey Milk"
(TC Films International, 1984)
The life of San Francisco’s first openly gay elected city official is told with revealing news clips and archival footage interspersed with personal reminiscences. Directed by Rob Epstein, the documentary is narrated by Harvey Fierstein. The film was selected to the National Film Registry in 2012.

Thursday, Jan. 24 (7:30 p.m.)
"The Wishing Ring; an Idyll of Old England"
(World Film, 1914)
In this lighthearted cross-class romance directed by Maurice Tourneur, the son of an Earl falls in love with the parson’s daughter and buys her a magical ring from gypsies that he claims will make her wishes come true. The comedy-drama stars Vivian Martin, Alec B. Francis and Chester Barnett. Ben Model will provide live musical accompaniment. This silent film was selected for preservation to the National Film Registry in 2012. The program will also feature two additional silent short films: 2011 National Film Registry selection "A Cure for Pokeritis" (Vitagraph, 1912), starring the American film industry’s earliest comic superstar John Bunny; and the mystery "The Evidence of the Film" (Thanhouser, 1913), which was named to the National Film Registry in 2001.

Friday, Jan. 25 (7:30 p.m.)
"A Program of Mary Pickford Short Subjects"
(Biograph/Imp, 1909-1912)
A selection of short films made early in Mary Pickford’s career will be presented, including "The Informer" featuring Pickford as a Confederate captain’s sweetheart in a tale of the Civil War. The film was directed by D.W. Griffith. Christel Schmidt, editor of the new book "Mary Pickford: Queen of the Movies," will introduce the series of silent films. Andrew Simpson will provide live musical accompaniment.

Saturday, Jan. 26 (7:30 p.m.)
"Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall"
(United Artists, 1924)
Marshall Neilan, a frequent collaborator with Mary Pickford, directed this grand historical drama set in 16th century England. Pickford plays the title character, a rebellious daughter of nobility, who refuses to abide by a prearranged marriage after falling in love with the son of a family enemy. Christel Schmidt, editor of the new book "Mary Pickford: Queen of the Movies," will introduce the film. Andrew Simpson will provide live musical accompaniment.

Thursday, Jan. 31 (7:30 p.m.)
"Golddiggers of 1933"
(Warner Bros., 1933)
Dick Powell stars as a millionaire-turned-composer who rescues unemployed Broadway people by producing a new play. Mervin LeRoy directed this lavish musical comedy-drama, which also features Warren William, Joan Blondell and Ruby Keeler. The film was selected to the National Film Registry in 2003.

# # #

PR 12-230
12/28/12
ISSN 0731-3527

Back to top