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May 14, 2010

Jewish Women Comedians Are Subject of Documentary Film

Film Clips from “Making Trouble” To Be Shown at the Library on May 26

As demonstrated by vaudevillian Sophie Tucker, silent film and stage star Molly Picon, Ziegfeld Follies star Fanny Brice, stand-up comic Joan Rivers, "Saturday Night Live" performer Gilda Radner and Broadway’s Wendy Wasserstein, American Jewish women comedians have made an indelible impact on the entertainment world and the times in which they lived. Each was unique in her talent but shared the joy and burden of being Jewish, female and funny.

Their stories are told in "Making Trouble," a documentary film produced by the Jewish Women’s Archive (JWA). JWA Executive Director Gail Twersky Reimer will show clips from the film and discuss a century of American Jewish women comedians at a program to be held at the Library of Congress at noon on Wednesday, May 26 in the Mary Pickford Theater, located on the third floor of the James Madison Building at 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, D.C.

Sponsored by the Hebraic Section of the Library’s African and Middle Eastern Division and the Hebrew Table, the event is free and open to the public; tickets are not required.

Founded in 1995, the Jewish Women’s Archive (www.jwa.org (external link)) is a national nonprofit organization devoted to making known the stories, struggles and achievements of Jewish women in North America to enrich understanding of the past and to ensure a more inclusive future.

Founded in 1800, the Library of Congress is the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution. The Library seeks to spark imagination and creativity and to further human understanding and wisdom by providing access to knowledge through its magnificent collections, programs and exhibitions. Many of the Library’s rich resources can be accessed through its website at www.loc.gov and via interactive exhibitions on a personalized website at myLOC.gov.

Recognized as one of the world’s foremost centers for the study of Hebrew and Yiddish materials, the Library’s African and Middle Eastern Division holdings include works in Hebrew, Yiddish, Ladino, Judeo-Persian, Judeo-Arabic, Aramaic, Syriac, Coptic and Amharic. The section’s holdings are especially strong in the areas of the Bible and rabbinics, liturgy, Hebrew language and literature and Jewish history. For more information, visit the African and Middle Eastern Division in person or online at www.loc.gov/rr/amed/.

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PR 10-114
05/14/10
ISSN 0731-3527

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