Educational Program
 

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The Next Generation Privacy Communications Act, September 30

 

About the Program

A generous grant from the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation has enabled the Law Library of Congress to host the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation Program on Demography, Technology and Criminal Justice at the Library of Congress. By drawing on its existing collections, targeting new acquisitions, and leveraging staff expertise, the Law Library of Congress has created a program that focuses on creating new research in the field of criminal justice. The program is administered by a Board of Advisors comprising scholars, practitioners, policymakers and other professionals focused on the development of criminal law as it is affected by advances in technology.

The research will generate benchmarks, metrics, best practices, and practical solutions to some of the emerging legal issues that fall at the intersection of demography, technology, and criminal justice. To have the greatest impact, the program has been designed to bring together multidisciplinary and multinational participation. Finally, the program will provide a corpus of scholarship that can be accessed by scholars, practitioners, policymakers, judges, and legislators around the world and in perpetuity.

Scholar-in-Residence

- Orin Kerr responds to a question from Marc Zwillinger during the May 21, 2013 webinar

- Orin Kerr responds to a question from Marc Zwillinger during the May 21, 2013 webinar

Orin S. Kerr is the Law Library Scholar-in-Residence for the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation Program on Demography, Technology, and Criminal Justice at the Library of Congress. He is a tenured Professor of Law at George Washington University, where he teaches Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, and Computer Crime Law. The focus of Professor Kerr’s scholarship and academic research has been on how new technologies change criminal law and criminal investigations.

No stranger to technology, Professor Kerr blogs for The Volokh Conspiracy on a regular basis about developments in Internet privacy law and criminal law and continues to occasionally litigate cases in the area of police investigations. Professor Kerr has written extensively on Internet privacy and issues related to Internet security. His work has been cited in over 70 judicial decisions, including in the United States Supreme Court’s January 2012 decision in United States v. Jones on the constitutionality of the warrantless use of GPS monitoring.

Professor Kerr recently testified before the United States House of Representatives Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security and Investigations on “Investigating and Prosecuting 21st Century Cyber Threats," concerning the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) codified at 18 U.S.C. § 1030. He appeared before the Subcommittee again to testify on the reform of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), which regulates government access to Internet communications and records.

The topics addressed in these hearings are also the subject of the work Professor Kerr is doing as Law Library Scholar-in-Residence for the Guggenheim Program. His work, “The Next Generation Communications Privacy Act,” was the subject of a webinar held on May 21 and May 22 that featured a panel discussion by leading attorneys, academics, and other eminent professionals, including James Dempsey, Richard Salgado, Chris Soghoian, and Marc Zwillinger. More information about this program can be found via the Law Library blog, In Custodia Legis .

Scholarly Resources

The collections of the Library of Congress and the Law Library contain numerous resources related to the topics of this program. A bibliography of some of these items will be made available here soon.

Webinars

Webinar 1: "The Next Generation Privacy Act"
May 21, 2013

Webinar 2: "The Next Generation Privacy Act"
May 22, 2013

 

Last Updated: 02/28/2014