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Churchill and the Great Republic
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Image: John Churchill to Sarah Churchill, May 24, 1706
John Churchill to Sarah Churchill, May 24, 1706
The Duke of Marlborough wrote this note to his wife on May 24, 1706, the day following his triumph at Ramillies (in present-day Belgium) over French forces during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714). While actively pursuing his beaten enemy, he asked her to tell her friend Queen Anne that he had been victorious: "the greatest pleasure I have in this success is that it may be a great service to her affairs."
Object Details:
Holograph letter. Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (5)

Related Theme:
Forebears and Family
Transcript:
May 24, 1706

I did not tell my dearest soul in my last the design I had of engaging the enemy if possible to a battle, fearing the concern she has for me might make her uneasy, but I can now give her the satisfaction of letting her know that on Sunday last we fought, and that God Almighty has been pleased to give us a victory. I must leave the particulars to this bearer, Colonel Richards, for having been on horseback all Sunday, and after the battle marching all night, my head aches to that degree that it is very uneasy for me to write. Poor Bingfield, holding my stirrup for me and helping me on horse back, was killed. I am told that he leaves his wife and mother in poor condition.

I can't write to any of my children, so that you will let them know that I am well and that I desire they will thank God for his preserving me. And pray give my duty to the Queen and let her know the truth of my heart, that the greatest pleasure I have in this success is that it may be a great service to her affairs; for I am sincerely sensible of all her goodness to me and mine. Pray, believe me, when I assure you that I love you more than I can express.
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